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Ethiopia’s ambassador to South Sudan, Nebil Mahadi, and South Sudan Defense and Veteran Affairs Minister Angelina Teny, April 24, 2021. Photo MFA

 

April 24, 2021 (JUBA) – Ethiopia’s ambassador to South Sudan, Nebil Mahadi, and South Sudan Defense and Veteran Affairs Minister Angelina Teny on Saturday held discussions on the bilateral and regional issues of common concern.

Nebil, Ethiopia’s Foreign Affairs ministry said, underscored Ethiopia’s unwavering commitment to the implementation of the South Sudan peace agreement and the overall peace and prosperity of the people of South Sudan.

He also emphasized the need to redouble efforts of the two nations to enhance their infrastructural linkage.

Nebil also briefed Teny about GERD, Ethio-Sudan border dispute, rehabilitation and relief efforts in Tigray, and the ongoing general election in Ethiopia.

Highlighting Ethiopia’s ardent belief in fair and equitable use of transboundary natural resources, the ambassador pointed out that GERD is an African project and is purely aimed at nothing but lifting more than 65 million Ethiopians out of darkness and chronic poverty.

Ethiopia is keen to solve the differences with the lower riparian countries through negotiation within the existing African Union forum, Ambassador Nebil reiterated.
With Regard to the border dispute between Ethiopia and Sudan, he expressed the country’s full commitment to solve the issue amicably based on the already existing agreements and mechanisms.

The ambassador commended the initiative extended by President Salva Kiir to mediate the dispute, noting that Ethiopia demands the restoration of the status quo ante before commencement of talks.

Meanwhile, the South Sudanese Defense minister appreciated Ethiopia’s long-standing commitment and support for the people of South Sudan.

She said South Sudan is commitment to the peace, stability and prosperity of Ethiopia.

The minister further underscored Ethiopia’s pivotal role in the stability of the region and beyond, stressing that, “we can’t afford unstable Ethiopia,"

Teny also highlighted that the issue of Tigray is purely an internal agenda and there is no need for outside interference on the matter.

Regarding GERD, the minister stressed that all the riparian countries should have equal access to the Nile waters, given that it is a matter of right to use the waters for the benefit of the people.

She also emphasized the need to reach a common ground in the ongoing GERD negotiations through the existing African Union platforms, based on the principle of “African solutions to the African problems.” - Sudan Tribune

(ST)

Following is UN Secretary-General António Guterres’ message on the International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, observed on 7 April:

I am privileged to participate in the commemoration of the International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi in Rwanda. 

This year marks 27 years since more than 1 million people were systematically murdered in less than three months in Rwanda.  They were overwhelmingly Tutsi, but also Hutu and others who opposed the genocide.

Those days in 1994 remain in our collective conscience as among the most horrific in recent human history.  On this Day, we honour those who were murdered, we reflect on the suffering and we recognize the resilience of those who survived.  As we join in solidarity with the people of Rwanda, we must take a hard look at today’s world and ensure that we heed the lessons of 27 years ago.

Today, around the globe, people are threatened by extremist groups determined on boosting their ranks through social polarization and political and cultural manipulation.  These extremist movements represent the principal security threat in many countries.  While the technology and techniques that extremists use are evolving, the vile messages and rhetoric remain the same.  The dehumanization of communities, misinformation and hate speech are stoking the fires of violence.

The COVID-19 pandemic underscores the urgency of addressing deepening divides.  The global health crisis has profoundly affected the entire spectrum of human rights in every region, further fuelling discrimination, social polarization and inequalities — all of which can lead to violence and conflict.  We saw what happened in Rwanda in 1994, and we know the horrific consequences when hate is allowed to prevail. 

Preventing history from repeating itself requires countering these hate-driven movements that have become a transnational threat.  We must redouble our efforts and forge a common agenda, to renew and reinvigorate our collective actions going forward.  In doing this, we must defend human rights and continue to push for policies that fully respect all members of society.

Rwanda experienced one of the most painful chapters in modern human history, but its people have rebuilt from the ashes.  After suffering unspeakable gender-based violence and discrimination, Rwanda’s women now hold more than 60 per cent of parliamentary seats — making Rwanda a world leader.  The people of Rwanda have shown us the power of justice and reconciliation and the possibility of progress.

On this solemn Day, let us all commit to building a world guided by human rights and dignity for all. UN

A prison officer receives the first injection of the Oxford AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine from a nurse at Mulago referral hospital in Kampala, on March 10, 2021. PHOTO/AFP.

At least 3,000 nurses have been killed by Covid-19, the global nurses' federation said Thursday as it warned of a looming exodus of health workers traumatised by the pandemic.

Exactly one year on since the World Health Organization (WHO) first described Covid-19 as a pandemic, the International Council of Nurses said burn-out and stress had led millions of nurses to consider quitting the profession.

And once the pandemic is over, a dwindling number of experienced nurses could be left to handle the giant backlog of regular hospital care that had been postponed due to the crisis, the ICN warned.

The known death toll of nurses killed by the disease -- compiled from just 60 countries -- is likely to be a gross underestimate of the full total, the federation said.

ICN chief executive Howard Catton said nurses had gone through "mass traumatisation" during the pandemic, being pushed to physical and mental exhaustion.

"They reach a point where they've given everything they can," he told reporters.

Catton said the global workforce of 27 million nurses was six million short going into the pandemic -- and four million were heading for retirement by 2030.

- 'On a precipice' -

In a report, the ICN said the pandemic "could trigger a mass exodus from the profession", from as early as the second half of 2021. The global nurse shortage could widen to nearly 13 million, it added.

"We could be on a precipice," said Catton, recalling that it took three to four years of training to produce a novice nurse.

He said nurses had done a "phenomenal" job "to lead the world through this pandemic", saying they would share an equal platform with the vaccine creators in the eventual history of Covid-19.

But once the pandemic has passed, frazzled nurses will then have to deal with all the unmet healthcare needs and waiting lists, whilst also facing likely staff shortages.

Founded in 1899, the ICN is a federation of more than 130 national nursing associations.

It called for governments to invest in training more new nurses to address the global shortage.

It also called for better pay to encourage existing staff to stay on -- to bolster health systems for future crises, if nothing else.

- Vaccination call -

The WHO wants to see healthcare workers in all countries being vaccinated within the first 100 days of 2021.

Catton said that was the start line rather than the finish line, and voiced "grave concerns" at the unequal distribution of vaccines between rich and poor countries.

For nurses, facing an elevated risk of infection, immunisation "is about their right to being protected at work," he said.

"Not being protected at work adds to their distress." 

Recalling the public appreciation shown towards nurses in the early stages of the pandemic, Catton said that now, "overwhelmingly, nurses would rather be getting their vaccine than a round of applause".

The ICN strongly recommended that all nurses take a Covid-19 jab.

"It is an issue of protection and safety for patients," Catton said.

"If somebody doesn't have the vaccine then it may well be that you have to look at redeploying them to other areas." By AFP/Daily Monitor

 

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